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Tested > 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Story & Snaps: Amee Reehal ©

Ironically, the most powerful, most dynamic press car I’ve tested to date, in the 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S, perhaps proved to be one I drove most conservative. Why? When you’re behind the wheel of a coupe that reaches 200km/h in under11 seconds (and100km/h in only 3.3 seconds), a speeding ticket will not only wipe out your HELOC, it will inevitably land you in jail. Or even worse: lead to divorce.

With that said, the Porsche 911 Turbo S is undoubtedly a track car. Freeways and highways reserved for the commoners simply don’t do this coupe justice unless you’re doing at least a buck-fifty and weaving through traffic like pylons, while playground zones, construction zones, and every other speed-prohibiting instrument will just get in the way.

Last year, the week my son was born, I was testing the 2010 911 Turbo, doing diaper runs at lightning speeds. This year, diaper runs were a little quicker; the Turbo S adds 30 extra horses to the Turbo, providing the Turbo S with 530-hp. Even better, despite increased power and performance, the Turbo S, at 11.4-L/100km, won’t consume any more fuel than the Turbo. Plus, options in the Turbo all come standard in the top of the line Turbo S, priced at an even $200,000 MSRP CAD. The only option on my 911 Turbo S was the PDK Gear Selector at $1470.

The 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S, the first Turbo S in five years, is available in either coupe or cabriolet form, both powered by a 6-cylinder boxer engine equipped with a couple turbochargers, making 530-hp and 516lb-ft of torque. Paired with Porsche’s revolutionary seven-speed PDK double-clutch gearbox, along with all-wheel drive and Porsche Traction Management, the 2011 911 Turbo S tops out at 315km/hr (195mph). And stopping power is flawless with the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB)—a $15,000 option in the Turbo; now standard in the Turbo S.

To read my review on the 2010 Porsche 911 Turbo, visit 2010 Porsche 911 Turbo.

For more info on the 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S, visit Porsche Canada.

 

 

Tested > 2009 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S

The 2009 Porsche Cayenne Turbo-S: Not an SUV

Story & Snaps: Amee Reehal

After all these years, I still remember the advertising tagline for the Porsche Cayenne when it was first introduced to North America in 2002: “It’s not an SUV. It’s a Porsche.” Priceless. This more or less sums it up. A) We realize we’re a little late to the segment; we’re not calling it an SUV. B) We’re Porsche. We build the world’s finest cars this side of Stuttgart. We don’t need to explain ourselves. Nor should they. Call it what you wish, sport utility or otherwise, Porsche has arguably created one of the world’s most impressive 4-door performance vehicles (with exception, perhaps, to the 2010 Porsche Panamera!)—marrying classic Porsche styling with craftsmanship, along with such audacious power and performance, the Cayenne Turbo-S’ nearest competitor is still stuck in The ‘90s. When Blazers, Tahoes, Escalades, and the like, had long inundated North American driveways turn of the century, Porsche was evidently M.I.A. Even the Europeans got in on the action with Mercedes-Benz releasing the M-Class in 1998 and BMW with the X5 in 2000. Sure, perhaps they were riding it out, assessing the SUV market before T-boning the competition for leftover sales. Or perhaps Porsche values craftsmanship over market share, going against the grain, building performance vehicles and not necessarily sport utility vehicles consumers seek.

Performance

Propelling this heavy 2360-kg rocket is a 4.8-litre twin turbo V8, producing a whopping 550-hp and 553-lb ft of torque, paired to a 6-speed Tiptronic-S transmission with the Hill Holder function, offering an extra 30-hp from the 2008 Turbo-S, sharing essentially the exact same displacement as the current model, the extra power comes by way of improved airflow via exhaust and intake, along with some engine revamping (and in case you were wondering, a 260-hp bump from the entry-level Cayenne…for an extra $100,000 or so, in case you were wondering this too). Clocking a zero to 60mph in 4.8 seconds with a top speed of nearly 280km/h, the Cayenne Turbo-S is fastest SUV available. Behind the wheel, the engine feels very smooth and clean. The V8 pushes this beast of a vehicle so effortlessly, you wouldn’t know this was an SUV until you got out gawked at it for a few minutes. Virtually, no noise or vibration—just pure Porsche refinement as one would expect.

Exterior Styling

Following the introduction of the first ever 2008 Turbo-S in 2007, the 2009 Turbo-S was introduced last year at the Beijing Auto Show. While both the ’08 and ’09 models are essentially the same, including the same powerplant, the latter does see some revisions with the more notable being extra horses. But hey, a few cosmetic changes second time around wouldn’t hurt, and if your friends can’t tell that you’ve traded up, the 21-inch SportPlus alloy wheels housed in wider fender flares should give it away. Other styling differences over the 2008 Turbo-S include an exclusive grey metallic paint option, body colour matched front intake grills and wheel arches, and Cayenne GTS style sporty aluminum quad tailpipes. If this doesn’t clear it up, it’s time for new friends.

The Cabin

The interior feels sporty with no compromise in luxury. The 12-way power front seats are well bolstered and comfortable. The unique 3-spoke multifunction wheel is wrapped in leather. The updated Porsche Communication Multimedia System Management (PCM) includes an array of things including navigation system and a 14-speaker surround sound Bose system. The touch screen is nestled in the middle of centre console, surrounded by an array of dials and buttons, sitting so low that toggling your view between the road and the screen is like watching a proper tennis match—except that this is both frustrating and dangerous. Perhaps relocate the vents and raise the entire centre console with the screen placed up top.

The Ride

The all-wheel drive is equipped with 38%/62% front/rear torque split, all sitting upon a fully independent air suspension system with PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management). The slick yet useful suspension leveling and ride-height control offers a more fine-tuned drive. Other features include a Low Range gearbox with variable centre drift and the Porsche Stability Management (PSM). And for those who take the Cayenne’s ‘utility’ seriously, the towing capacity is rated at 7715-lb. More power deserves better stopping ability, especially in a vehicle this size. The 2009 Turbo-S comes with optional composite ceramic brakes paired to 14.5” vented rotors with 6-piston calipers up front, and 14.1” vented rotors with 4-piston calipers in the rear. The 21-inch alloy wheels are wrapped in 295/35 performance tires.

Safety

Some of the standard safety features include 2-stage driver and passenger airbags, side airbags integrated in the front seats, curtain airbags from the A to C pillars, 3-point front and rear seatbelts with pre-tensioners, encapsulated in a fully galvanized high strength steal body.

So, what was the holdup Porsche? What took so long getting into the SUV game? Frankly, who cares—today, the Cayenne is Porsche’s best selling product. And after spending one glorious week with the 2009 Cayenne Turbo-S, I can see why. Besides, when you’re behind the wheel of the Turbo-S, the past is quickly forgotten and the future is simply the open road ahead.

For more info on the 2009 Porsche Cayenne lineup visit http://www.porsche.com/canada/models/cayenne/